Bath, a Historical Spa City in England


Bath is a historic Roman and Georgian spa
city. It is a World Heritage Site, situated 100 miles west of London and 15 miles south-east
of the nearest big city, Bristol. Bath is famous for its hot springs, Roman period baths,
Medieval heritage and stately Georgian architecture. Set in the rolling Somerset countryside on
the southern edge of the Cotswolds, Bath offers a diverse range of attractions for its 4.4
million visitors each year: restaurants, theatres, cinemas, pubs and nightclubs, along with interesting
museums, and a wide range of guided tours. Bath is among the oldest of England’s principal
tourist destinations and has been welcoming visitors for centuries. Bath first achieved
its status as a sacred spa site with the growth of the Roman settlement Aquae Sulis around
the thermal springs. The Roman period saw a vast complex of baths constructed – the
remains of these were re-discovered in the 18th century and helped fuel Bath’s modern
revival as a luxury resort. Bath was a prosperous city in the Medieval
period, the site of an Abbey and Cathedral. The Reformation under Henry VIII saw some
uncertainty emerge in Bath’s future, although the reign of Elizabeth I saw the first revival
of the town as a spa resort. It was during the Georgian period, however, that Bath came
once again into its own. Exceedingly fashionable, Bath was laid out in stately avenues, streets
and crescents, encrusted with Neo-Classical public buildings. Bath suffered a significant amount of damage
during air raids in World War II. The prestigious crescents and terraces were relatively unscathed
and restored where necessary, but some of the more minor Georgian and Victorian streets
were demolished both after the war and during a later ill-conceived phase of development
known now as the “Sack Of Bath”.

2 Replies to “Bath, a Historical Spa City in England”

  1. Bath is a historic Roman and Georgian spa city. It is a World Heritage Site, situated 100 miles west of London and 15 miles south-east of the nearest big city, Bristol. Bath is famous for its hot springs, Roman period baths, Medieval heritage and stately Georgian architecture.

    Set in the rolling Somerset countryside on the southern edge of the Cotswolds, Bath offers a diverse range of attractions for its 4.4 million visitors each year: restaurants, theatres, cinemas, pubs and nightclubs, along with interesting museums, and a wide range of guided tours.

    Bath is among the oldest of England's principal tourist destinations and has been welcoming visitors for centuries. Bath first achieved its status as a sacred spa site with the growth of the Roman settlement Aquae Sulis around the thermal springs. The Roman period saw a vast complex of baths constructed – the remains of these were re-discovered in the 18th century and helped fuel Bath's modern revival as a luxury resort.

    Bath was a prosperous city in the Medieval period, the site of an Abbey and Cathedral. The Reformation under Henry VIII saw some uncertainty emerge in Bath's future, although the reign of Elizabeth I saw the first revival of the town as a spa resort. It was during the Georgian period, however, that Bath came once again into its own. Exceedingly fashionable, Bath was laid out in stately avenues, streets and crescents, encrusted with Neo-Classical public buildings.

    Bath suffered a significant amount of damage during air raids in World War II. The prestigious crescents and terraces were relatively unscathed and restored where necessary, but some of the more minor Georgian and Victorian streets were demolished both after the war and during a later ill-conceived phase of development known now as the "Sack Of Bath".

    Video: Bath, a Historical Spa City in #England http://youtu.be/HATeDNhrAS0

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